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BOOK

 
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NOVEL

The book is written as a novel, while at the same time it offers an abundance of quotes from primary sources, such as diaries, letters, memoirs, testimonies, and depositions. The story, therefore, unfolds in front of the reader in a most lively and vibrant style.

 

The book offers previously unpublished texts in English, such as excerpts from the testimonies of the Novo-Tikhvin nuns, who were taking provisions to the Imperial Family at the Ipatiev house, and from the testimonies of Ipatiev guards.

The book brings to light a multitude of unknown and unrevealed facts, which evince that many truths remain silenced or distorted to this day. Such are:

• The events of the 1905 revolution and Bloody Sunday.
• Russia’s and Tsar Nicholas’ involvement in WW1.
• The plots and conspiracies to overthrow Tsar Nicholas from his throne.
• The myth of the “Bread Revolution” and the truth about the February 1917 coup.

HISTORY REVISITED

THE MURDER

The most accurate account of the murder of the Romanovs ever presented in a book. No fictional additions. The information used in The Chapter of Blood draws exclusively from the memoirs and depositions of the murderers and the guards, as well as from the official forensic investigations and studies of the remains. The chapter also includes unpublished material relating to the family’s imprisonment in Ekaterinburg.

Letters

PERIOD OF SEPARATION OF THE FAMILY

IN TOBOLSK & YEKATERINBURG

Tobolsk 12/25 April 1918
 

My dear and sweet beloved Papa,


I hope that You will arrive soon. I have tried to eat a lot and heal quickly. How good it is you travel with our good soldiers. That God may keep you. I hug you strongly and make the sign of the cross upon you. I pray for You. I hope that Gracious God keeps and watches over you. We will all be in each others arms everything and all.
 

Your Alexei

TESTIMONIES, DIARIES, MEMOIRS

SIR JOHN HANBURY WILLIAMS

CHIEF OF THE BRITISH MILITARY MISSION IN RUSSIA

"January 14, 1916:

The Russian New Year's Day.

 

Had a long talk to Alexeieff and Admiral Russin on munition matters, in which there appears to be some improvement, due no doubt to the energy with which the Emperor pursues this all-important question.

March 17, 1916:

The Emperor after an absence of some time returned to Headquarters yesterday. He is always so bright and cheerful that one cannot but be cheerful with him. It is a wonderful temperament for a man who must have such cares and anxieties on his mind, and I am sure is a good inspiration for others."

VASILY YAKOVLEV

BOLSHEVIK COMMISSAR

From the arrival at Ekaterinburg Station:  April 30, 1918

On the morning of the 30th we arrived in Ekaterinburg without any incident. Despite our early arrival, the Ekaterinburg station was overflowing with people … The situation was becoming extremely dangerous. The crowd was pushing against us and kept getting closer to the train. Its mood was becoming more threatening … In order to at least temporarily restrain them, I shouted loudly to my lined-up guards: “Prepare the machine guns”. The pushing crowd fled, but threatening shouts towards me could be heard. The same fat commissar with a big stomach yelled in a frenzied voice: “We are not afraid of your machine guns. We have prepared cannons against you. See them sitting on the platform”!

IPATIEV HOUSE GUARD

BOLSHEVIK

Testimony

Maria Nicholaevna was to me more friendly. If she had been fed when hungry and would be allowed to rest out in the open air, she would have done. A true Russian beauty, although in her veins flowed a blood rather more German, Danish and English than Russian. When Maria Nicholaevna smiled, her eyes shined so brightly that it was a pleasure to see. Her face was more often pink than her sisters. Her laughter was so cheerful.

ANATOLY YAKIMOV

IPATIEV HOUSE GUARD

Testimony

The Tsar approached him and started talking about the weather. The Tsar was no longer young. His beard had some grey in it. I saw him in a tunic, belted with an officer’s belt with a buckle. The buckle was yellow, and the belt was yellow. Not light yellow, but dark yellow. The tunic was khaki. The same khaki colour were his pants, and old worn looking boots. His eyes were nice, kind, as was his entire face. In general, he gave the impression of being a nice person, simple, sincere and talkative. He looked like he wanted to talk to us.  
 

NICHOLAS II ROMANOV

ROYAL MARTYR

Letter to his mother: October 20, 1902

In the sight of my Maker I have to carry the burden of a terrible responsibility, and at all times be ready to render an account to Him of my actions. I must always keep firmly to my convictions and follow the dictates of my conscience.
 

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